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Renewable Natural Gas from Wastewater and Food Waste?

Stockhouse Editorial
2 Comments| January 21, 2022

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California's number one source of methane emissions are landfills, according to flyover readings.

Across the US, more than 43% of what gets sent to landfills is either food waste, yard clippings or paper/cardboard, much of which could be diverted from landfills and anaerobically digested to make renewable natural gas.

On Friday, Anaergia Inc. (TSX: ANRG, Forum) announced that its subsidiary, SoCal Biomethane will officially commission operations at the Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority facility in Victorville, California.

This facility will be the first wastewater treatment plant in California to inject renewable natural gas made from both wastewater solids and food waste into a utility pipeline.

The company offers technologies that convert existing infrastructure at wastewater treatment plants into highly efficient systems capable of treating both wastewater residual solids as well as food waste.

It is expected that the new plant will assist local municipalities to comply with California’s Senate Bill 1383, which require every municipality to divert residents’ and businesses’ food and other organic waste from landfills, with the goal of reducing the amount of organic waste landfilled by 75% by 2025.

The company’s Chairman and CEO, Andrew Benedek said in a news release that under Senate Bill 1383, every municipality in California must now find a way to reduce food waste and other organic waste going to landfills.

“In this way, existing infrastructure can be extended to serve new California requirements in a very efficient way. The net result is beneficial to all concerned, as it lowers the cost of operating a wastewater plant, helps the municipality meet the organic waste disposal requirements, and helps our planet by creating carbon-negative fuel. Our partnership with VVWRA is an example for the entire state on how to solve the current requirements efficiently.”

The renewable natural gas being created here will be used as a carbon-negative transportation fuel to displace petroleum and to help California achieve its clean air and climate goals.

State agencies estimate that at least 50-100 new or expanded facilities will be needed to annually recycle the over 20 million tons of organic waste that will be collected from residents and commercial businesses and diverted from landfills as the law is implemented.



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